Landmark360 Blog Landmark360 Blog http://landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?rss=1 hourly 1 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D329804%2Fcollege-and-program-tour-tips College and Program Tour Tips Mon, 08 May 2023 04:00:00 +0000 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D329804%2Fcollege-and-program-tour-tips <p>Make the most of your college and program tours with these helpful tips from Landmark360. Learn what to look for and how to prepare.</p> <div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Whether it’s spring and campuses are sprouting with flowers, trees budding, and you’re hopefully dodging frisbees, or it’s fall and the academic life is blooming and you’re still hopefully dodging frisbees, college campuses are fun to walk around. There is no true substitute for walking around a campus to feel it out, take in the vibe, and try it on. <strong>So, go on tours.</strong></p><p>As a prospective student, here are some things to consider as you go on tours. First, do some research and know the basics before setting foot on campus.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p><img alt="students visiting college" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/college_visit.jpg?v=1683297549803" /></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h3>BEFORE Visiting a Program</h3><p>Doing some research before setting foot on campus will make the visit worthwhile. Here are some things to consider before you go on a tour:</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="One"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="one" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-1-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682969794678"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>Population</strong></h5><p>Learn about the undergraduate student population. Is it small, medium, or large? Compare this to the size of your current high school. </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Two"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="two" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-2-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682970153340"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>Retention</strong></h5><p>What is the freshman retention rate?<em><br> How many students return after their freshman year? This shows how effectively the admission team accepts quality students and how well the school supports its students.</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Three"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="three" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-3-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682970169308"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>Graduation</strong></h5><p>What is the graduation rate?<em><br> This number tells the percentage of students who graduate within four years. This is generally a good sign of academic follow-through.</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Four"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="four" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-4-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682970180939"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <p><strong></strong></p><h5><strong>Majors</strong></h5><p>Do they have the major/areas of interest you want to study? What questions can you ask about your major?</p><p><em></em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Five"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="five" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-5-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682970192842"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <p><strong></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><h5><strong>Location</strong></h5><p>What is the surrounding area like? How close is the campus to a town/city area and conveniences like airports, bus, and train stations?  </p><p><em></em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Six"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="six" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/number-6-in-navy-circle.png?v=1682970204876"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <p><strong></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><h5><strong>Support Services</strong></h5><p>What are the support services to ensure your success there? Are there separate offices for Student Support, Disability/Accommodation, Tutoring? Is there a comprehensive (fee-based) program for support? How do I qualify / do I need to qualify? Many schools are offering more support for the general population, not just disability based. Pay attention to this!</p><p><em></em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>All the research questions above are available in a downloadable template with space to take notes, as well as rate the importance of each item, and rank your schools/programs after you've toured. </p><p><a class="button" href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/180UqPhKO7R4wcZCJTYJI1IkaqaUXUOEh3gmr-VjTxfQ/edit?usp=sharing" target="_blank">Download Topics to Research BEFORE Visiting</a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Visit Tips"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h3>Questions to Ask DURING a Visit</h3><p>After you’ve found out the basics and still want to tour the school, here’s some guidance while you’re on the tour or chatting with the admission counselor. Most of these answers will be distinguished by the person you are asking these questions to–a freshman tour guide may give different answers than a senior student guide, and certainly may give different answers than an admissions staffer. </p><p>This is not an exhaustive list of questions to ask, but answers to these questions will provide some structure for your visit and will help you compare programs to each other. </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="One Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question one" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-1-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683030346569"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What kind of student thrives best at this school/program?</strong></h5><p><em>If this is answered by a paid representative from the institution (an admissions office staffer), they’ll tell you what they’re looking for, and you’ll need to figure out if that’s you or not. A student may provide a slightly different answer. Ask both!</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Two Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question two" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-2-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683030367904"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What do students do on the weekends? Are there campus activities? </strong></h5><p><em>Try to get the company word as well as the real deal. Most students will tell you both!</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Three Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question three" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-3-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683030583903"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What are the most popular majors on campus? What’s the percentage? What are the most interesting or ‘sleeper’ majors? </strong></h5><p><em>If it’s a campus of 50% engineering majors, you’ll get 50% of ‘engineering-minded’ students. Insert Art, Business, Psychology etc… not picking on engineers! Are those your people? Can you envision yourself on the campus? Are these 'your people'?</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Four Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question four" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-4-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683031509216"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What are the largest classes you could have as a freshman or sophomore? How many large classes can you expect?</strong></h5><p><em>Ask yourself what the ideal class size is for you to learn best. Will you need support if the classes are too large? </em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Five Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question five" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-5-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683031566083"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>Who teaches the freshman classes? Teaching assistants? Graduate assistants? Full professors? Will you get enough contact with and/or attention from them?</strong></h5><p><em>Professors and/or full-time faculty would be the preferable answer.</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Six Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question six" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-6-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683031623282"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong><strong>What are some of the most popular </strong>extracurricular activities? What student organizations are the most active on campus?</strong></h5><p><em>This gives a good indication of the campus culture and what type of students are there.</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Seven Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question seven" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-7-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683031661980"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What resources do you have for students if they are struggling with a class? </strong></h5><p><em>The answer to this can reveal how able the school is to support students or if they expect them to be more independent. You’ll probably need to ask thoughtful follow-up questions about what types of tutoring they offer and who these tutors are. Are there academic and psychological counseling services? Are there other layers of support services? Do they mention disability services?</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Eight Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question eight" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-8-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683032939853"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What additional structure do you have for incoming freshmen?</strong></h5><p><em>How proactive are they with onboarding you properly for success? Some schools have freshman cohort classes, some have special advisors, social programs, and/or residential supports which can all be really helpful in making a smooth transition. </em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Nine Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question nine" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-9-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683033064255"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What initiatives are planned for the growth of the school?</strong></h5><p><em>Are there new dorms and/or academic buildings, new academic departments, or majors being added. Are athletic facilities growing? Admissions staff will likely be better equipped to answer this than students. Are these substantive changes or is this refreshing/polishing what they already do? In what way would these projects change/enhance the quality of student life?</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Ten Visit"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5 use-original-image"> <p><img alt="Question ten" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/question-10-in-blue-circle.png?v=1683033113452"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4-5"> <h5><strong>What’s the food like and how are meal plans structured? </strong></h5><p><em>Food and dining services are very important! Make sure to take time to have a meal on campus and test it out for yourself. </em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Additional Questions"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h3>Additional Questions to Ask Student Guides</h3><p>When you are touring with a student guide, get specific: </p><ul><li>What made you choose this school? What other schools did you consider?</li><li>What is one piece of advice that you would give to an incoming freshman? </li><li>What did you do for fun last weekend? </li><li>What’s the hardest thing you’ve found about transitioning from high school?</li><li>What would you do differently if you could do it all over again?</li><li>What’s your favorite tradition at this school?</li></ul><p>These are a lot of questions to keep track of. We have provided a downloadable template with all the Tour Questions and space to take notes, rate the importance of each item, and rank each school/program.</p><p><a class="button" href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1O5hQHRJNcmo8-SRuq2A-qXPGjLKVYvCQgDuKIhvWd0g/edit?usp=sharing" target="_blank">Download Template of Tour Questions</a></p><h3>Have Fun</h3><p>Overall, have fun and don’t be shy. Student tour guides love being asked questions about student life. Admissions reps will remember you more if you make an impression and ask thoughtful questions. Lastly, if you need help preparing for visits, schedule some time with your guidance counselor. They would be happy to help you prepare. </p><p>Good luck and enjoy the process!</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="About the Author"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h3>About the Author</h3><p>Kevin Roberts has been a Landmark faculty member since 2005. He served as a long-time houseparent, LA and Lit teacher, a XC coach, and now a guidance counselor. He’s coached hundreds of youth in various areas of life, and enjoys continuing to do so. When not at Landmark you’ll find him on the sidelines of soccer fields across New England with his own four kids, or else hiding in the woods with his easiest dependent, Ace. </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><img alt="Kevin Roberts" src="https://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/kevin_roberts_headshot.jpg?v=1683547210073"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --> http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D323155%2Fdyslexia-a-guidebook-blog-series Dyslexia: A Guidebook Blog Series Wed, 19 Apr 2023 04:00:00 +0000 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D323155%2Fdyslexia-a-guidebook-blog-series <p>Landmark School's blog series on navigating the gifts and challenges of living with dyslexia at school, home, and work.</p> <div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Dyslexia: A Guidebook"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="Path winding between trees, books, and letters" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/FW23Cover2-2.jpg?v=1678801944702"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h2><span>Dyslexia Guidebook Blog Series</span></h2><p>Landmark School's blog series on navigating the gifts and challenges of living with dyslexia at school, home, and work. Read the articles and download a copy to share.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Click on the images below to read each article.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=320540"><img alt="Graphic saying Dyslexia: a Primer" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks.jpg?v=1678801100902"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=320991"><img alt="Graphic saying Dyslexia at School" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks2.jpg?v=1678801212281"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322046"><img alt="Graphic saying Dyslexia at Home" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks3.jpg?v=1678801264281"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-4"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322355&"><img alt="Graphic saying Dyslexia at Work" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks4.jpg?v=1678801314784"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="Dyslexia Guidebook cover" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/0001.jpg?v=1678805723661" /></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <div class="cb-intro"><h2 class="yellow-line-heading"><b>Dyslexia Guidebook</b></h2><p>Download the Dyslexia Guidebook or view it as a digital flip book.</p></div> <div class="cb"></div> <div class="submission-form-wrap"> <form class="submission-form" id="main-submission-form" action="/lantern/dyslexia-guidebook-2023-flipbook/dyslexia-guidebook-downloadable" method="post" data-fid="320850"> <input type="hidden" name="body_message_1" value="" /> <div class="form-section"> <div class="field-wrap field-email" data-field-type="email" data-field-id="320851"> <label for="custom-field-email">Email Address<em>*</em></label> <input type="email" id="custom-field-email" name="email" value="" size="20" maxlength="75" class=" required normal" placeholder="person@email.com" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-affiliation" data-field-type="multiselect" data-field-id="320852"> <label for="custom-field-affiliation">Affiliation<em>*</em></label> <select id="custom-field-affiliation" name="affiliation[]" data-placeholder="Select All That Apply" multiple="" class="do-chosen required "> <option value="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)">Landmark Parent (Current/Past)</option><option value="Landmark Alumni" data-field-option-id="Landmark Alumni">Landmark Alumni</option><option value="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)">Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)</option><option value="Family Interested in Landmark School" data-field-option-id="Family Interested in Landmark School">Family Interested in Landmark School</option><option value="Family of Student with Dyslexia" data-field-option-id="Family of Student with Dyslexia">Family of Student with Dyslexia</option><option value="Teacher" data-field-option-id="Teacher">Teacher</option><option value="Educational Professional" data-field-option-id="Educational Professional">Educational Professional</option><option value="Other" data-field-option-id="Other">Other</option> </select> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-other conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320864"> <label for="custom-field-other">Other<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-other" name="other" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-interest" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320863"> <label for="custom-field-interest">What is your interest in the Dyslexia Guidebook?</label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-interest" name="interest" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class="normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-title_and_organization conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="322044"> <label for="custom-field-title_and_organization">Title and Organization<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-title_and_organization" name="title_and_organization" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <!-- recaptcha stuff --> <div class="form-section" id="form-section-captcha"> <div class="field-wrap"> <div class="captcha-wrap"> <div class="recaptcha_widget"></div> </div> <!-- /.captcha-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <div class="submit-wrap"> <input type="hidden" name="form_submitted_320850" value="1" /> <input type="submit" value="Submit" class="button" id="submit-button" name="" /> </div> <!-- /.submit-wrap --> </form> </div> <!-- /.submission-form-wrap --> <div class="cb"></div> <script>var conditional_field_js_data_arr = {"320864":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Other"}],"322044":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Educational Professional"},{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Teacher"}]}</script> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --> http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D320540%2Fdyslexia-a-primer Dyslexia: A Primer Wed, 12 Apr 2023 04:00:00 +0000 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D320540%2Fdyslexia-a-primer <p>Learn the basics about dyslexia. This article is part of the Dyslexia Guidebook series.</p> <div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="illustration of a brain with letters and a book inside" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/Primer_Opener_Square2.jpg?v=1677003229618"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h2><strong><span>What is Dyslexia?</span></strong></h2><h4><span>Dyslexia is a common difference in the way the brain is wired to learn to read, write, and spell.</span></h4><h6><span>by Kimberly Hildebrandt</span></h6> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="What is Dyslexia"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2-3"> <p>Although the characteristics and degree of dyslexia vary, <strong>people with dyslexia generally have trouble matching the sounds of language to their symbols.</strong> This makes reading challenging, along with other essential literacy skills, such as writing and spelling.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><img alt="illustration of a speech bubble saying "cat", and flash cards saying "Fat, Rat, Sat"" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/Cat_Fat_Rat.jpg?v=1677002313136"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><img alt="Book of ABCs" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/ABC.jpg?v=1677002335930"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2-3"> <p>The human brain develops speech naturally, <strong>but we are not “wired” to read.</strong> Our brains must construct this ability. While people with dyslexia don’t “grow out of it,” with proper instruction, especially when provided early in life, people with dyslexia can learn to read.1</p><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2-3"> <p>Dyslexia has no bearing on intelligence. And although these individuals learn differently, <strong>they often excel in analytical thinking, complex problem-solving, innovating, creativity, and more. </strong></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><img alt="illustration of Albert Einstein" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/Einstein4-03.jpg?v=1677001731105"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr><h4><span>Read More About Dyslexia!</span></h4><p><u><a href="https://dyslexiaida.org/frequently-asked-questions-2/"><span>Frequently Asked Questions</span></a></u> <span><em>International Dyslexia Association</em></span><u><a href="https://dyslexia.yale.edu/dyslexia/what-is-dyslexia/"><span><br> What Is Dyslexia?</span></a></u> <span><em>The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity</em></span><sup><br> 1</sup><u><a href="https://falling-walls.com/discover/articles/we-were-never-born-to-read/"><span>We Were Never Born to Read</span></a></u> <span><em>Falling Walls</em></span></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Signs of Dyslexia"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h2><span><strong>Signs of Dyslexia</strong></span></h2><h4><span>Dyslexia looks different for everyone, but here are some common signs, some of which may be recognized in children as young as three years old.<sup>2</sup> </span></h4> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h4><span><strong>Phonological Awareness</strong></span></h4><p>Difficulty recognizing sounds in words, such as:</p><p><strong>* segmenting words</strong> into their parts <br> (e.g. cowboy broken into cow-boy)</p><p><strong>* blending individual sounds</strong> into larger words <br> (e.g. /b/ /a/ /t/ into bat)</p><p><strong>* manipulating sounds </strong><br> (e.g. what’s bat without the /b/ at the beginning?)</p><p><strong>*</strong> difficulty <strong>recognizing rhyme</strong></p><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h4><span><strong>Decoding  </strong></span></h4><p>Difficulty matching letter names to their sounds (e.g. the letters “ph” make the sound /f/) or, in older children, sounding out unfamiliar words.</p><p><img alt="illustration of a mouth making the sound "Ph"" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/PH2.jpg?v=1677003986884"></p><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h4><span><strong>Other Signs in Older Children   </strong></span></h4><p>Sometimes dyslexia is not recognized until a child is older, when peers are already reading. <br> Additional signs of dyslexia may include:<sup>4</sup></p><p><strong>* Frustration,</strong> such as avoiding reading, or complaining that reading is too hard</p><p><strong>* Slow and laborious reading </strong>(poor reading fluency)</p><p><strong>* Spelling/writing</strong> that is unusually difficult to decipher</p><p><strong>* Difficulty understanding</strong> or remembering what one reads or summarizing a story</p><p><strong>*</strong> Having trouble understanding idioms or puns or <strong>not “getting the joke”</strong></p><p><strong>*</strong> Frequently <strong>making the same mistakes</strong><strong></strong></p><hr><h4><span><strong>Other Signs in Adults   </strong></span></h4><p>There are many adults who read through these signs and realize “Oh! This was me!’ </p><p>While many adults with dyslexia have found strategies to help them be successful, some may still struggle with reading and writing. They may be knowledgeable about a topic and able to express their ideas verbally, but not be able to write them down.<sup>3</sup> </p><p>These struggles, when not identified and remediated, can lead to anxiety and low self-esteem. </p><p>Even as an adult, if you suspect you have dyslexia, getting identified can be freeing and help you find support and more effective strategies to help with reading, writing, processing language, and learning.</p><hr><h4><span><strong>Read More:</strong></span></h4><p><sup>2</sup><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=253215/a-guide-to-early-markers-of-dyslexia"><span><strong></strong></span></a><u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=253215/a-guide-to-early-markers-of-dyslexia"><span><strong>Early Markers of Dyslexia:</strong></span></a></u> <span><em>Landmark360</em></span><sup><br> 3</sup><a href="https://www.dyslexia.uk.com/"><span></span></a><u><a href="https://www.dyslexia.uk.com/"><span><strong>What Is Dyslexia?</strong></span></a></u><span> <em>DyslexiaUK</em></span><sup><br> 4</sup><a href="https://www.understood.org/en/articles/checklist-signs-of-dyslexia-at-different-ages?_sp=5d923d53-066d-4b08-adec-49e5736a9b45.1666981208433"><span><strong></strong><strong><u>Signs of dyslexia at different ages.</u> </strong></span></a><span><em>Understood.org</em></span></p><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h2><span><strong>Facts and Myths</strong></span></h2><h3><span>There are many misconceptions about dyslexia. Take a look at some myths and facts.</span></h3><h3><span></span><img alt="illustration of lightbulbs and question marks" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/LightBulbs.jpg?v=1677007713424"></h3> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p><strong>Myth:&nbsp;</strong>People with dyslexia are not smart.<br> <strong>Fact:&nbsp;</strong>People with dyslexia have average to above average IQs and have unique strengths in other areas.</p> <p><strong>Myth:&nbsp;</strong>People with dyslexia won’t find success in life.<strong><br> Fact:&nbsp;</strong>It is true that a world built on reading can make the path for those with dyslexia harder, but people with dyslexia have unique skills that make them the future of our world’s workforce. (pg. 28) People with dyslexia are often advanced in visualizing, communicating, connecting, exploring, and imagining.<sup>5</sup>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> People with dyslexia have poor eyesight or read backward.<strong><br> Fact:&nbsp;</strong>Dyslexia is not a visual problem.</p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> Just because my child has dyslexia doesn’t mean I do.&nbsp;<strong><br> Fact: </strong>Dyslexia is strongly heritable, occurring in up to 50% of individuals who have a first-degree relative with dyslexia.<sup>6</sup></p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> People with dyslexia just need to work harder.<strong><br> Fact:</strong> People with dyslexia are often working twice as hard to compensate for their reading difficulties.</p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> You have to wait until late elementary school before being diagnosed with dyslexia.<strong><br> Fact:</strong> There are signs of dyslexia as early as age 3, before a child begins to learn to read, and screening can happen in kindergarten to determine if a child is at risk for dyslexia.<sup>6</sup></p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>Dyslexia isn’t that important as it doesn’t affect me.<strong><br> Fact:&nbsp;</strong>Most experts estimate that 20% of people have dyslexia, representing 80–90% of all those with learning disabilities. Chances are very likely that you know someone with dyslexia.<sup>7</sup></p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> People with dyslexia can be cured.<strong><br> Fact:</strong> &nbsp; People with dyslexia do not need a cure. With the right teaching approaches and strategies, people with dyslexia can learn to effectively read and write and will thrive.</p> <hr> <h4><span><strong>More About Dyslexia Facts and Myths</strong></span></h4> <p><sup>5</sup><a href="https://www.madebydyslexia.org/"><span><u>We’re Here to Redefine Dyslexia</u>&nbsp;</span></a><span><em>Made By Dyslexia</em></span><sup><br> 6</sup><u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=253249%2Fit-s-a-myth-that-young-children-cannot-be-screened-for-dyslexia"><span>It’s a Myth That Young Children Cannot Be Screened for Dyslexia</span></a></u><span>&nbsp;<em>Landmark360</em></span><sup><br> 7</sup><u><a href="https://dyslexia.yale.edu/dyslexia/dyslexia-faq/"><span>Dyslexia FAQ</span></a></u><span>&nbsp;<em>The Yale Center for Dyslexia &amp; Creativity</em></span><br> <u><a href="https://www.gaablab.com/dyslexia-myths" target="_blank"><span>Dyslexia Myths</span></a></u><span> <em>Gaab Lab</em><em></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h3><strong><span>So What Now?</span></strong></h3><p>If you think you or a loved one may have dyslexia, you’re in good company! You belong to a group of people who are smart and creative communicators, explorers, and connectors.</p><p>School systems and workplaces are not always geared for people with dyslexia, so there are some things that you can do:</p><h4> </h4> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="illustration of a clubhouse for creative people" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/Clubhouse.jpg?v=1677081107020"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h4><span><strong>Get Diagnosed</strong></span></h4><p>Having a diagnosis can open important accommodations for people with dyslexia, which fall under the category of Specific Learning Disability (SLD). Work with your doctor, teachers, and, if needed, an independent psychologist.  </p><p>* Learn more about how to request an evaluation at school:<u><a href="https://www.understood.org/en/articles/6-steps-for-requesting-a-school-evaluation?_sp=5d923d53-066d-4b08-adec-49e5736a9b45.1665681485744"><span><br> 6 Steps to Request a Free School Evaluation</span></a><span> </span></u><u><span></span><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=253264"><span><br> Psychoeducational and Neuropsychological Evaluations Explained</span></a></u></p><hr><p><u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=253264"><span></span></a></u></p><h4><span><strong>Talk About It</strong></span></h4><p>If your child has dyslexia, don’t be reluctant to talk with them about it. </p><p>* Here are some tips: <u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog?id=253210/the-best-way-to-explain-learning-disabilities-to-your-child"><span><br> The Best Way to Explain Learning Disabilities to Your Child</span></a></u></p><hr><p><u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog?id=253210/the-best-way-to-explain-learning-disabilities-to-your-child"><span></span></a></u></p><h4><strong><span>Persist </span></strong></h4><p>Finding the right interventions to help your child requires patience. Don’t give up! Take the time to learn the best ways to support and empower your child. There is a movement to redefine dyslexia. </p><p>* Learn more about it: <a href="https://www.madebydyslexia.org/ "><span><br><u>Made By Dyslexia</u></span></a></p><hr><p><a href="https://www.madebydyslexia.org/ "><span></span></a></p><h4><span><strong>Key Take-Aways</strong></span></h4><p>* Dyslexia is a difficulty learning to read, write, and spell.<br> * The earlier a student gets intervention, the better the outcome. <br> * Dyslexia is the most common learning disability, affecting about 20% of people.7 <br> * People with dyslexia are smart, often with above-average intelligence. </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap" data-title="Download form"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="Dyslexia Guidebook Cover" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/0001.jpg?v=1677097406015"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <div class="cb-intro"><h2 class="yellow-line-heading"><b>Dyslexia Guidebook</b></h2><p>Download the Dyslexia Guidebook or view it as a digital flip book.</p></div> <div class="cb"></div> <div class="submission-form-wrap"> <form class="submission-form" id="main-submission-form" action="/lantern/dyslexia-guidebook-2023-flipbook/dyslexia-guidebook-downloadable" method="post" data-fid="320850"> <input type="hidden" name="body_message_1" value="" /> <div class="form-section"> <div class="field-wrap field-email" data-field-type="email" data-field-id="320851"> <label for="custom-field-email">Email Address<em>*</em></label> <input type="email" id="custom-field-email" name="email" value="" size="20" maxlength="75" class=" required normal" placeholder="person@email.com" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-affiliation" data-field-type="multiselect" data-field-id="320852"> <label for="custom-field-affiliation">Affiliation<em>*</em></label> <select id="custom-field-affiliation" name="affiliation[]" data-placeholder="Select All That Apply" multiple="" class="do-chosen required "> <option value="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)">Landmark Parent (Current/Past)</option><option value="Landmark Alumni" data-field-option-id="Landmark Alumni">Landmark Alumni</option><option value="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)">Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)</option><option value="Family Interested in Landmark School" data-field-option-id="Family Interested in Landmark School">Family Interested in Landmark School</option><option value="Family of Student with Dyslexia" data-field-option-id="Family of Student with Dyslexia">Family of Student with Dyslexia</option><option value="Teacher" data-field-option-id="Teacher">Teacher</option><option value="Educational Professional" data-field-option-id="Educational Professional">Educational Professional</option><option value="Other" data-field-option-id="Other">Other</option> </select> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-other conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320864"> <label for="custom-field-other">Other<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-other" name="other" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-interest" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320863"> <label for="custom-field-interest">What is your interest in the Dyslexia Guidebook?</label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-interest" name="interest" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class="normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-title_and_organization conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="322044"> <label for="custom-field-title_and_organization">Title and Organization<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-title_and_organization" name="title_and_organization" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <!-- recaptcha stuff --> <div class="form-section" id="form-section-captcha"> <div class="field-wrap"> <div class="captcha-wrap"> <div class="recaptcha_widget"></div> </div> <!-- /.captcha-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <div class="submit-wrap"> <input type="hidden" name="form_submitted_320850" value="1" /> <input type="submit" value="Submit" class="button" id="submit-button" name="" /> </div> <!-- /.submit-wrap --> </form> </div> <!-- /.submission-form-wrap --> <div class="cb"></div> <script>var conditional_field_js_data_arr = {"320864":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Other"}],"322044":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Educational Professional"},{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Teacher"}]}</script> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Check out our additional posts from this series:</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=320991"><img alt="" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks2.jpg?v=1678214861978"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322046"><img alt="" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks3.jpg?v=1678214882792"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322355"><img alt="" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks4.jpg?v=1678214896079"></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --> http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D320991%2Fdyslexia-at-school Dyslexia at School Wed, 05 Apr 2023 04:00:00 +0000 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D320991%2Fdyslexia-at-school <p>Supporting your student with dyslexia.<br /> This article is a part of the Dyslexia Guidebook series.</p> <div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="Sorting box with round holes and square pegs" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/SquarePegs(2).png?v=1677180832215"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h2><span><strong>Dyslexia at School</strong></span></h2><h4><span>Seeking specific support at each step of your child’s educational career can lead to a more productive and enriching school experience. </span></h4><h6><strong><span>by Rob Kahn</span></strong></h6><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Consider this excerpt from the IDA’s definition of dyslexia:  “It is referred to as a learning disability because dyslexia can make it very difficult for a student to succeed academically in the typical instructional environment…”</p><p>For people with dyslexia, the school years often present challenges. Any delay in acquiring or employing literacy skills sets students with dyslexia apart in an environment where processing language is the basis for nearly every expectation and interaction.</p><p>Whatever the stage of schooling, the reason the school years can be difficult is the same “reason” that square pegs and round holes don’t play well together. Neither one is right or wrong, better or worse. </p><p>They just aren’t designed to work with each other. The more we learn about the strengths and challenges of having dyslexia, the more the disconnect between school and real life becomes apparent. </p><p>See <u><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog?id=270686/school-is-not-real"><span><em><strong>School is Not Real</strong></em></span></a></u> by Josh Clark for more on this.</p><p>The fight to even the playing field for all learners is two-fold: While we engage with the educational system in response to neurodiversity and real-world demographics, we also have to examine how to give those students with dyslexia tools to survive and thrive. It is not zero-sum: A useful assumption is that everyone involved wants all students to succeed.</p><p>Let’s organize the typical school journey into stages, and talk about essentials for navigating the school experience.</p><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5"> <p><img alt="blocks" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/SquarePegs(2).png?v=1678303281588"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3-5"> <h4><span><strong>The Early Years</strong></span></h4><p>Family members and caregivers play a key role in the preschool years. Experts agree that early identification is the path to acquiring basic literacy skills, and getting a diagnosis is the key to accessing effective remediation and accommodations when needed.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Resources such as the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity, Reading Rockets, and many others have helpful information on what to look for at an early age.</p><p><a href="https://dyslexia.yale.edu/resources/parents/what-parents-can-do/suspect-dyslexia-act-early/"><em><strong>Suspect Dyslexia: Act Early</strong></em></a>                           </p><p><em><a href="https://www.readingrockets.org/teaching/prek_guide">Pre-K Getting Ready to Read and Write</a></em></p><p>Early assessment with science-based screening tools is growing. As of July 28, 2022, 29 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws or implemented new policies related to evidence-based reading instruction. Information on Massachusetts’s policy and laws around literacy screening can be found at:</p><p><em><a href="https://www.doe.mass.edu/instruction/screening-assessments.html">Early Literacy Universal Assessment</a></em> and <em><a href="https://www.doe.mass.edu/sped/dyslexia-guidelines.pdf">Massachusetts Dyslexia Guidelines.</a></em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr /> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5"> <p><img alt="school house" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/SchoolHouse.jpg?v=1678303396170"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2-3"> <h4><strong></strong></h4><h4><span><strong>Elementary Through High School     </strong></span></h4><p>For students with dyslexia, it’s not primarily about content and curriculum but rather about access and the rules of engagement. The more that curriculum and assessment depend on literacy skills and traditional norms of presentation and testing, the greater the risk that students with dyslexia will be marginalized and not well served.   </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>There is no longer a debate that a science-based, structured language approach to teaching reading is the most effective method for students with dyslexia. Parents and students can use a variety of sources to keep informed about and evaluate the approaches to literacy acquisition practiced in their school.</p><p>If we look at the two sides of the challenge—equipping the dyslexic brain for school while trying to shape school to be inclusive of all brains, we can identify key priorities for parents and students:</p><ul><li><strong>Specific focus</strong> on literacy skills as a primary goal along with content</li><li><strong>Appropriate modifications</strong> in class and on assignments</li><li><strong>Interfacing with instructors </strong>who are informed about dyslexia and are also patient and flexible</li><li><strong>Communication</strong> for families to school personnel in a supportive, non-adversarial channel; students to teachers from the standpoint of self-knowledge and advocacy.</li></ul><p>Retooling educational systems, like any systemic change, will take time and sustained advocacy. Informed students and parents/guardians can use local and national resources (Decoding Dyslexia, International Dyslexia Association [IDA], National Center for Learning Disabilities [NCLD], The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity Advocacy Toolkit) to work both sides of the equation: ensuring successful experiences for their children by staying involved, looking at assessment results, asking questions, while also exploring advocacy groups to push for equitable change for all types of learners. </p><p>Top priorities for educational policy makers and teachers at these levels are to institute effective training for identification and remediation (e.g., Landmark Outreach, LETRS) to ensure teachers have access to training during paid hours. Research has linked dyslexia to school failure and higher rates of incarceration for nearly 80 years.  </p><p>When their personality, strengths, and hopes are a mismatch with the expectations of the school environment, students with dyslexia are caught in a bind. They are always playing “defense” and trying to cope with demands while not having time or space to share their strengths. It can be a no-win situation if they are not provided with the basic tools needed to succeed. As students get older and assume increasing responsibility for their personal journey, schools and families are faced with a metacognitive challenge: while students learn, they also need to learn how they learn. When an educational setting matches student needs, such as Landmark School, you begin to hear families say things like, “I have my child back.”</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr /> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-5"> <p><img alt="graduation cap" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/graduationcap.jpg?v=1678303534300"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2-3"> <h4><strong></strong></h4><h4><span><strong></strong></span></h4><h4><span><strong>Post-Secondary</strong></span></h4><p><strong>Self-Knowledge Leading to Self-Advocacy </strong></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Remediation during the later school years has a threefold goal: provide the literacy skills needed, restore self-confidence and a sense of competence, and instill a game plan that supports the student’s learning profile for future success.</p><p>Here’s what we’ve learned from our own students and families at Landmark School:</p><ul><li>Be clear and realistic about the next step after high school. </li><li>Make the student an active partner in determining the right fit for the immediate future. </li><li>Be open to alternatives when exploring the path that feels right, which may be a gap year or a vocation. </li><li>If the immediate next step is college, seek out schools known for their student services and validate what you learn by visits and information from alumni.</li></ul><p>Strategies and self-advocacy should be essential take-aways from high school. The strategies that work come from a student’s own understanding of their learning profile. The self-advocacy skills help in forming trusted relationships, two-way communication, and use of accommodations.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <hr /> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h3><strong>Learn More About How to Teach Reading:</strong></h3><p><em><a href="https://dyslexia.yale.edu/resources/parents/what-parents-can-do/the-a-to-z-of-teaching-beginning-reading/">A-Z of Teaching Reading</a></em><em><br> The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity</em></p><p><em><strong><a href="https://www.readingrockets.org/helping/questions">Questions and Answers/FAQs</a></strong></em><br><em>Reading Rockets</em></p><p><em><a href="https://www.readingrockets.org/faqs/there-anything-i-can-do-home-help-my-dyslexic-child-learn-read-and-spell">Providing support for your child with dyslexia at home</a></em><em><br> Reading Rockets</em></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <h4><img alt="toolbox filled with school supplies" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/Toolbox2(1).jpg?v=1677184547770"></h4><h4><span><strong>Technology for High School, College, and Beyond</strong></span></h4><p>In the formative years when literacy skills are being built, tech work-arounds can actually be a drawback. While they may allow access to content, if they bypass acquiring a toolbox for literacy, then they are not sustainable as a strategy. However, once in college, students with dyslexia generally find technology skills to be absolutely essential, combined with organizational and executive functioning assists to make time management and self-monitoring productive. Landmark alumni have mentioned products with integrated suites of features such as Capti Voice, Read&Write Gold, and apps such as Notability and Recorder Plus for their utility—and there are many others. But the key is the underlying self-advocacy and metacognitive awareness that students take away from their school years. </p><p>This translates into the ability to determine what works best for each individual in their particular post-secondary or graduate setting. For example, Olivia Hearn ’22 noted: “If you read your notes to someone like you are teaching them, you can retain the information better,” and Ethan Cadorette ’22 added that basic organizational habits have become critical scaffolding in college: “I still use an organizer for all my work to stay on top of assignments. You can forget assignments very easily and the teacher won’t always remind you. I put all dates of exams from the syllabus into my calendar. You are on your own for a lot of the work you do in college unless you seek out the help, which I recommend you do if you feel it’s beneficial.” </p><p>It’s not the bells and whistles that define what works, but rather the metacognitive understanding of the person using the tech assist. As alumna Ashley Holmes ’13 points out: “The tool that I use the most at work is the read aloud function in Word. It helps me proofread important content. The computer has to read exactly what I write and sometimes it does not make sense. I am able to hear the mistake and make the necessary changes. If I proofread my work without an audio assistant I would read what I want it to say, not what I wrote.”</p><p>For individuals with dyslexia, greater acknowledgement and validation in the last few years have led to positive change, but there is much to do—particularly in schools.</p><ul><li>For the pre-school and early years: continue to push for early identification and linguistically based approaches.</li><li>During elementary and secondary school: increase teacher training initiatives and accommodations.</li><li>In the post-secondary world: use technology and curriculum that not only facilitates learning but also incorporates the valuable perspectives of neurodiversity.</li></ul> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Check out our additional posts from this series:</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=320540"><img alt="Graphic for article Dyslexia: A Primer" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks.jpg?v=1678215259482" /></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322046"><img alt="Graphic for article Dyslexia: At Home" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks3.jpg?v=1678215331170" /></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-3"> <p><a href="https://www.landmarkschool.org/our-school/landmark-360-blog/?id=322355"><img alt="Graphic for article Dyslexia: At Work" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/Lantern/Dyslexia/BlogBlocks4.jpg?v=1678215381030" /></a></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="Dyslexia Guidebook Cover" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/0001.jpg?v=1678302248069" /></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <div class="cb-intro"><h2 class="yellow-line-heading"><b>Dyslexia Guidebook</b></h2><p>Download the Dyslexia Guidebook or view it as a digital flip book.</p></div> <div class="cb"></div> <div class="submission-form-wrap"> <form class="submission-form" id="main-submission-form" action="/lantern/dyslexia-guidebook-2023-flipbook/dyslexia-guidebook-downloadable" method="post" data-fid="320850"> <input type="hidden" name="body_message_1" value="" /> <div class="form-section"> <div class="field-wrap field-email" data-field-type="email" data-field-id="320851"> <label for="custom-field-email">Email Address<em>*</em></label> <input type="email" id="custom-field-email" name="email" value="" size="20" maxlength="75" class=" required normal" placeholder="person@email.com" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-affiliation" data-field-type="multiselect" data-field-id="320852"> <label for="custom-field-affiliation">Affiliation<em>*</em></label> <select id="custom-field-affiliation" name="affiliation[]" data-placeholder="Select All That Apply" multiple="" class="do-chosen required "> <option value="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Parent (Current/Past)">Landmark Parent (Current/Past)</option><option value="Landmark Alumni" data-field-option-id="Landmark Alumni">Landmark Alumni</option><option value="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)" data-field-option-id="Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)">Landmark Faculty/Staff (Current/Past)</option><option value="Family Interested in Landmark School" data-field-option-id="Family Interested in Landmark School">Family Interested in Landmark School</option><option value="Family of Student with Dyslexia" data-field-option-id="Family of Student with Dyslexia">Family of Student with Dyslexia</option><option value="Teacher" data-field-option-id="Teacher">Teacher</option><option value="Educational Professional" data-field-option-id="Educational Professional">Educational Professional</option><option value="Other" data-field-option-id="Other">Other</option> </select> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-other conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320864"> <label for="custom-field-other">Other<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-other" name="other" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-interest" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="320863"> <label for="custom-field-interest">What is your interest in the Dyslexia Guidebook?</label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-interest" name="interest" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class="normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> <div class="field-wrap field-title_and_organization conditional-field" data-field-type="text" data-field-id="322044"> <label for="custom-field-title_and_organization">Title and Organization<em>*</em></label> <input type="text" id="custom-field-title_and_organization" name="title_and_organization" value="" size="20" maxlength="150" class=" required normal" /> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <!-- recaptcha stuff --> <div class="form-section" id="form-section-captcha"> <div class="field-wrap"> <div class="captcha-wrap"> <div class="recaptcha_widget"></div> </div> <!-- /.captcha-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.field-wrap --> </div> <!-- /.form-section --> <div class="submit-wrap"> <input type="hidden" name="form_submitted_320850" value="1" /> <input type="submit" value="Submit" class="button" id="submit-button" name="" /> </div> <!-- /.submit-wrap --> </form> </div> <!-- /.submission-form-wrap --> <div class="cb"></div> <script>var conditional_field_js_data_arr = {"320864":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Other"}],"322044":[{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Educational Professional"},{"conditional_field_id":"320852","conditional_field_option_id":"Teacher"}]}</script> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --> http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D322046%2Fdyslexia-at-home Dyslexia at Home Wed, 29 Mar 2023 04:00:00 +0000 http%3A%2F%2Flandmarkschool.org%2Four-school%2Flandmark-360-blog%2F%3Fid%3D322046%2Fdyslexia-at-home <p>Ways to support people with dyslexia at home.<br /> This article is a part of the Dyslexia Guidebook series.</p> <div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <p><img alt="illustration of a chore chart" src="http://www.landmarkschool.org/uploads/images/landmark_360/Dyslexia_Lantern/ChoreChart.png?v=1677786710884"></p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> <div class="ss-content-block col-2"> <h2><span><strong>Dyslexia at Home</strong></span></h2><h4><span>A supportive home life can lead to more success for students with dyslexia and can foster strong relationships and increased confidence. </span></h4><h6><strong><span>by Chrissy Kenney</span></strong></h6><p> </p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block --> </div></div> <!-- /.ss-section-wrap --><div class="ss-section-wrap"><div class="ss-section-wrap-inner"> <div class="ss-content-block col-1"> <p>Managing your child’s learning disability at home may at times feel frustrating. It can be hard to understand why certain everyday skills are challenging for someone with dyslexia or another language-based learning disability (LBLD). But for all people, regardless of learning styles or challenges, the way we interact with the world, process information, interpret social cues, and problem solve—extends beyond the classroom to who we are at home, with friends and family, and elsewhere. It makes us who we are.</p><p>We’ve compiled some helpful tips with strategies that might make accomplishing certain tasks at home and in social relationships more successful.</p> </div> <!-- /.ss-content-block -->